Metrics We Use: Fenwick, Situational Corsi, CF%, FF%

Mmmm....hockey stats.

Mmmm….hockey stats.

Yesterday, I used four stats to discuss how the Rangers are not a team that sits on a lead. Those four stats I introduced to the blog (note: These are not new stats, just new to being used on this blog) were Fenwick, Situational Corsi, CF%, and FF%. Since the Rangers are off today, now would be a good time to go into detail about each stat.

Fenwick

Fenwick is the easiest to describe, since it is a lot like Corsi. Corsi is the plus/minus of the number of shot attempts taken by a team that are missed, blocked, or on net. It is something we have used very often on the blog. Fenwick is almost the exact same thing as Corsi, but it removes blocked shots from the equation. The logic here is that it eliminates coaching strategy from the equation. Some coaches preach blocking shots, and others preach preventing shot attempts. Fenwick eliminates that variable.

Personally, I prefer to use Corsi when analyzing players. That said, Fenwick is a bit more reliable when comparing players on different teams, since it does eliminate the coaching variable.

Situational Corsi

Situational Corsi is exactly what it sounds like, it is the Corsi of a team in specific game situations. The types of situations measured are tied, close (+/- 1 goal), up 1, down 1, up 2+, down 2+. These are used to illustrate how a team plays or adjusts their style based on the score. Generally you will see teams with lower situational Corsi when up more than two goals, which is expected. This correlates directly to higher situational Corsi when down two or more.

CF%

CF% (Corsi-For Percent) is the percentage of Corsi for a team. The formula is CF (Corsi-For, or the raw number of shot attempts for a team) / (CF + Corsi Against). The purpose of this stat is to determine the percentage of shot attempts taken by a team in the game. So if Team A takes 50 shot attempts, and Team B has 100 shot attempts, then Team A’s CF% is 50/(50+100) = 33.3%. They took 33% of all of the shots in the game.

FF%

FF% (Fenwick-For Percent) is exactly what you would think it is. It takes CF%, and just replaces Corsi with Fenwick. The same purpose applies as well. FF% is used to determine the percentage of shot attempts (not including blocked shots) for a team in a game.

As always, be sure to read up on the Metrics We Use page, as this is an archive for all of our metrics definitions and purposes.

9 Responses to “Metrics We Use: Fenwick, Situational Corsi, CF%, FF%”

  1. TxRangerLovesSideBoob says:

    This is the stuff right here where this blog earns its stripes. Let’s go Rangers.

  2. Steffen says:

    Could you elaborate a bit more on why Fenwick takes out coaching?
    Because, as I understand now, corsi is total shot attempts whilst Fenwick only those who come near the goalie, but why not count quality scoring chances (whatever that may be (construct/debatable))? Or even why just not count shots on goal then with Fenwick, because blocked shots are no threat (unless deflected) and missed shots aren’t a threat too…

    • Dave says:

      Some defensive styles promote shot blocking, while others promote limiting shot attempts. It eliminates that variable.

      • Steffen says:

        So Fenwick is just shots on net and shots that did not reach the net (in whatever manner)?

        • Dave says:

          Fenwick is shots on net + missed shots that aren’t blocked. Corsi is shots on net + missed shots + blocked shots.

  3. Bloomer says:

    The only stat that matters is the scoreboard when the final buzzer sounds.

  4. RayP says:

    I like hockey because unlike baseball and other sports the only stat is the one on the scoreboard.
    The game is fast and emotional.
    Put down the calculator and buy a pair of skates and play the game even a pick up game. After a few hours you will realize
    The only thing that matters in the game is
    Which team is skating harder and has the most desire.
    Thats the hockey !