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Category: Business of Hockey

Next stop: Yankee Stadium

2014-NHL-Stadium-Series

sportslogos.net

With last night’s tough loss to St. Louis out of the way, the hockey world’s attention now turns to the much publicized “Stadium Series” games, starting this Saturday.  This weekend’s festivities will see the Ducks and Kings face-off on Saturday at Dodger Stadium (with some of the ugliest unis going, by the way) while the Rangers will battle the Devils on Sunday at Yankee Stadium.

When the NHL announced that there would be five outdoor games in addition to the Winter Classic played this year, much of the reaction centered around some variation of “overkill”.  This is a novelty concept that was charming with one game on New Year’s day, but would the concept be turned into a gimmick by playing this many games outside?  I have to admit,  I was skeptical.

The Rangers were the beneficiaries of two of the five Stadium Series games, against the Devils and Islanders, respectively.  Personally, I was hoping Yankee Stadium’s big hockey reveal would come during a Winter Classic, but alas, it was not meant to be.  The weirder part was that both of these games would feature the Rangers in road white.  Read more »

The NHL missed the mark on goalie fighting

Foxsports.com

Foxsports.com

Unless you’ve been living under the proverbial hockey rock, then you at least heard something about the Ray Emery/Braden Holtby incident from a few weeks back.  For those of you who didn’t, here’s the short version: during a 7-0 drubbing of the Flyers at the hands of Washington, a scrum ensued down in the Caps’ end.  Clearly frustrated, Ray Emery decided to skate the length of the ice and viciously pummel a clearly unwilling Braden Holtby.  It was disgusting and deserved supplemental discipline.  However, Brendan Shanahan was unable to cite authority in the rulebook granting him the right to impose further punishment on Sugar Ray.

Fast forward to last week, where it became known that the NHL powers-that-be were going to discuss the incident at the GM meetings in Toronto.  The only hitch, they were talking about banning goalie fights.  Wait, what?

Contrary to the title of this post, this piece actually has nothing to do with goalies.  The only thing that makes goalies relevant to this discussion is that it’s the position Emery and Holtby happen to play, and the league is taking this ridiculous stance to solve the problem.  So, let me get this straight: a willing combatant assaults a completely unwilling combatant, beats him senseless and the solution is, to ban goalie fighting? Read more »

Cap savings from the recent roster moves

Note: Sorry for no post this morning, there was a scheduling issue.

With both Arron Asham and Martin Biron assigned to the AHL yesterday, the Rangers cleared a total of $1.85 million in cap space ($925k a piece). Although their cap hits are higher (Asham – $1 million, Biron – $1.3 million), the “Redden Rule” means that they don’t get to bury the entire contract. Asham’s contract will remain with a $75k cap hit, and Biron’s with a $375k cap hit (unless he retires, then they get the full $1.3 million back).

With Talbot ($562,500) and Miller (approximately $894k) called up, the additional cap taken up is $1.45 million between the two. At the moment, the Rangers have saved about $400k in cap space. That could climb to $775k if Biron retires. Not exactly chump change.

There should be another roster move or two coming, as Carl Hagelin will need to come off LTIR. His $2.25 million will need to count towards the cap again when he returns.

A quick note regarding Glen Sather’s comments on Derek Stepan

For those that missed it, General Manager Glen Sather had some harsh words for holdout center Derek Stepan. Slats, in a rare moment, said that he doesn’t think [Stepan] is a big enough fool to think that he will sit out the year and it will do any good.” Naturally, that was the line that the media caught on to and ran with. The nugget right after –when Slats states that every player (forward) has signed a gap deal, and that what Stepan will get– is the more important bit. It confirms what we all know, but also puts a line in the sand in the negotiations.

First things first, Slats never called Stepan a fool. He chose his words carefully. Slats is also correct in the bridge deals, not in that every team should offer bridge deals, but in the manner that Slats approaches them. He is consistent. Every non-arbitration forward gets a bridge deal. Every single one. It’s consistency at its finest. Both Brandon Dubinsky and Ryan Callahan got paid, Dubinsky likely slightly overpaid, after their bridge deals. Callahan is the captain of the team too, and his bridge deal will likely be less than Stepan’s.

Some call what Slats said a desperation move. I call it a simple candid statement, used to send a message. Everyone else got one, you get one too. Get your head on straight and sign, and we will pay you oodles of money in two years if you continue to perform.

Derek Stepan and CBA inefficiency

It signs the contract or else it gets the hose again.

Up until pre-season games start up in earnest, the fan focus around Rangerland will continue to be Derek Stepan’s unresolved contract situation.  The boys around here have done a fantastic job covering the specifics, comparables and negotiating leverage surrounding the Blueshirt’s final RFA, but I wanted to examine a slightly different facet: the gaping hole in the CBA that lead to this situation to begin with.

The age in which a player signs his ELC will determine whether or not he is eligible for arbitration rights during his RFA years.  Depending on how long the ELC is, a player could foreseeably have two years (though, usually just one) of RFA eligibility without receiving arbitration rights.  This essentially means a player is allowed to seek “market” value (compared to other team-controlled players with no arbitration rights), but is still somewhat at the whim of the team’s valuation, with very little negotiating leverage. Read more »

Kadri deal reinforces higher market value for Stepan

Stepan > Kadri

Stepan > Kadri

In case you missed it, Nazem Kadri signed a two-year bridge deal with the Toronto Maple Leafs last night worth $2.9 million per season. Kadri has just 99 NHL games played –only one full season– and has a line of 23-37-63 over those 99 games. In his only full season, the lockout shortened season, Kadri put up 18-26-44. That 18-26-44 should look familiar, since it is the same line Derek Stepan put up last season. That should mean that Stepan’s market value is $2.9 million, right? Well, not exactly.

The problem is that Kadri has just one full year under his belt. He was bouncing between the AHL and NHL for the first two years of his pro career before that. Stepan cracked the roster immediately, and has three full years (without missing a game) under his belt. The point total for this year may have been the same, but Stepan has 212 NHL games played and a line of 56-84-140. That is an average of 0.66 P/G (1.91 P/60). Kadri’s average was 0.63 P/G (2.35 P/60).

Just an aside: I don’t know where I can find career –or even three-year average– P/60, which is the stat I wanted to use here. P/G isn’t terrible, but P/60 is a more accurate reflection. However, the point is still made. (Thanks George)

Read more »

Latest round of pad reductions illustrates need for more effective advocacy for goaltenders

ingoalmag.com

ingoalmag.com

The other day, I was reading one of my favorite goalie-related publications, InGoal Magazine.  There was a fantastic article about some NHL tendys giving their thoughts on the new equipment sizing and some of the difficulties the changes pose.  After reading the article and seeing some of the drastic reductions in size, I started thinking about the involvement of the Union and the type of representation that goalies are receiving during this type of transition.

There has been talk of allowing goalies up until the Olympic break to comply with the new rules, and further talk of revisiting the measurements in the off-season (not to see if they are effective, mind you, but to take another crack at reductions).  After examining all the information from the article and investigating further into the compromise made with regard to the reduction formula, I arrived at the conclusion that goalies are not being advocated for properly in the new-NHL. Read more »

At financial crossroads, how will Rangers cope?

Money or success?

Money or success?

We knew this time was coming. Rangers’ fans knew that as the team’s window of contention began to open so would the period come where multiple essential Rangers would approach contract negotiation time. It leaves the Rangers in a sort of crossroads over the next twelve months.

With Derek Stepan still unsigned, Henrik Lundqvist, Dan Girardi and Ryan Callahan all approaching free agency, the absolute core of this team – Rick Nash aside – is in need of new deals. Whether the Rangers can afford to pay the going rate for all these players is questionable. Brad Richards’ uncertain future, the impending free agency of Anton Stralman, and a potential career year –in a contract year– for Derick Brassard also play roles in the questionable financial future for the Rangers.

Read more »

Despite high cap number, Rangers are not going over the ceiling

Don't worry, there's enough room to sign him (Photo credit: Christopher Pasatieri).

Don’t worry, there’s enough room to sign him (Photo credit: Christopher Pasatieri).

When the Rangers re-signed Mats Zuccarello the other day, the attention rightfully shifted to Derek Stepan. Many went to Capgeek and saw that the Rangers had a shade over $2 million of cap space, and began to instantly panic. After all, if Stepan’s market value is the $3.75 million that Claude Giroux received in his bridge deal (that value will be used as Stepan’s cap hit for the sake of this post), then the Rangers don’t have enough room. However, the data on Capgeek is a tad misleading.

Capgeek currently lists everyone signed to a one-way deal. Per the summer cap rules, any player that does not have a separate –and lower– AHL salary, thus the definition of a two-way deal, must count against the summer salary cap. This is why players like Aaron Johnson are currently listed on the roster. There are some nuances that I don’t quite understand — For example, why Chris Kreider counts, but JT Miller doesn’t. I seriously don’t understand that, so any answer would be helpful– but this is also the reason why each team can spend 10% over the cap ceiling each summer. For the Rangers, this means they can spend $70 million this summer, giving them ample space to sign Stepan.

Read more »

Deadspin: MSG has ten years at its current location

Deadspin is reporting that MSG has ten more years at its current location, and then it will likely need to find a new place to call home. MSG’s 50-year permit expired this past year, and MSG was lobbying to extend that permit. While the initial pitch was for a permanent lease on the area, the City Council voted last night, per Deadspin, to limit the new permit to ten years. The vote wasn’t even close, with the City Council voting 47-1 to limit the lease to that duration.

The timing couldn’t be worse, as James Dolan just dropped a cool $1 billion of his own money renovating the new MSG. It won’t be difficult for Dolan to make a profit off that investment, especially because it was $1 billion over three years. MSG will make that back in no time. What it does mean is that MSG will have a new home in ten years, and that the city’s plan to have a new Penn Station will finally come to fruition.