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Torts reveals disagreements were with Sather not players in interview with ESPN NY

This past week John Tortorella was interviewed on The Michael Kay Show on ESPN NY radio. During the interview Torts was pretty candid about what went down after the season had ended. He discussed his great relationship with Henrik Lundqvist, his frequent disagreements with Glen Sather and how none of the players complained to him about his systems or philosophies during their exit interviews. Torts also discussed what he thought he could have done better as head coach of the Rangers, particularly against the Bruins who he admitted had better depth and an ability to roll four lines.

Although John’s post-game press conferences often left much to be desired, I always found his interviews on The Michael Kay Show to be quite the opposite and often counter to his persona. If anything, it’s an interesting interview and I think it may offer a little bit of closure to those of us who supported Torts during his tenure here.

7 Responses to “Torts reveals disagreements were with Sather not players in interview with ESPN NY”

  1. agentsmith says:

    torts knows what got him fired. hes aluded to it but hasnt said it outright.

    but as soon as he trashed hags post game to reporters he should have put his resume on monster.

    • Centerman21 says:

      That’s plain rediculous. All the ignorant fans and yourself included forget the fact he not only praised much of Hagelins game. He said he stinks on the PP. He said he’s a jitterbug like he can’t relax and just play. Followers like you had a problem with him before and just use those statements as your ammo! You put words in the mans mouth or in this case omit most of what he said to fit your arguement. Many people said that Torts “lost the locker room” when in truth none of the players voiced any displeasure with him at all! I’m sure you followed the leader with that one too! No one knows except Sather and himself so stop talking like you know.

  2. AD says:

    In the same sentence, Tortorella also praised Hagelin for other aspects of his game. Him being fired had nothing to do with those comments. Sather wanted a more open scoring system; a better power play and, as he stated himself, a more optimistic approach to the game. He simply sensed the wear and tear on the team and grind style of play had precluded the players from advancing any further.

    We can all get excited about AV, a new style of play and a new season. However, I still think it is more likely than not that the Rangers will have less success the next few years than they did under Tortorella.

    Sather has reached his shelf life, and needs to go.

  3. Bloomer says:

    Hags isn’t productive on the PP, what do you want a coach that blows smoke? It should of been Sather not Torts that was send packing.

  4. Tim B says:

    I love that Larry Brooks question. “That’ll be a blast” -Torts

  5. Jess Rubenstein says:

    I disliked Tortorella way before he was even hired as Ranger coach. But what I saw was Sather bringing/drafting players who were ideal for the “Safe is death” system that got Tortorella hired in the first place.

    I don’t understand why Tortorella chose to play the “Tom Renney” system. Still I blame Sather for why the season went south when he let Prust and John Mitchell walk.

    That’s not Tortorella’s fault it is Sather’s as the decision to give San Jose 3 draft picks including 2 picks in a very strong draft for a player declining skills.

    It will be a sad day when the Islanders move to Brooklyn and will have a much better team than the Rangers. Sather will be 70 in September so give him his gold watch and put him out to pasture already.

    • The Suit says:

      Agree with some of what you said Jess, but Torts employed an aggressive 2-1-2 forecheck, umbrella power play and used d-men much more aggressively on the rush and pinching in the o-zone.

      Renney ran a 1-2-2 trap, overload PP, and was more conservative with his dmen. The only thing they had in common was their collapsing d-zone strategy. Otherwise, the systems were polar opposites.